Careers – ADNET

Marshall space flight center jobs

Join Our Team!

ADNET Systems, Inc., based in Bethesda, Maryland, brings over 20 years of experience to information systems and professional services for the federal government. ADNET has a history of expertise in software development, computer network design, IT security, mission operations support, and educational outreach.

ADNET Systems, Inc. is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate in hiring or employment on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital or veteran status, disability, sexual orientation, gender identification, or any other legally protected status. Furthermore, ADNET is in full compliance with Executive Order 13665 -– Non-retaliation for Disclosure of Compensation Information. If you are unable to complete our on-line application, ADNET accepts emailed resumes as an alternative to the on-line system. Please contact [email protected] for any assistance.

SESDA

ADNET supports Space and Earth Science Data Analysis (SESDA) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland. ADNET works with GSFC to fulfill NASA’s vision for space exploration and the many missions of the Science and Exploration Directorate. We seek talented individuals to enhance our mission of providing premier support our customers.

To learn more about our SESDA contract, please visit our SESDA website.

ADNET was part of the winning team awarded the NASA End-user Services & Technologies (NEST) contract which officially started on September 1, 2019. Positions are located at Goddard Space Flight Center, Langley Research Center, and NASA Headquarters. The IT services on this contract support core Agency business and provide and manage much of NASA’s hardware, software, mobile IT, infrastructure, and end-user support. Services under NEST are managed by the End-User Services Program Office at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, and administered by the NASA Shared Service Center (NSSC).

Benefits

ADNET is an employee-centric company, committed to providing premier benefits that support our employees and their families. With affordable medical, dental, and vision plans, coupled with leading disability and life insurance options, ADNET offers our employees the dynamic benefits most sought after by today’s professional. Furthermore, our benefits package features the “extras” that distinguish us from other small businesses, ensuring our high employee retention that our customers appreciate. Some features of our compensation plans include:

  • Competitive Salaries
  • Annual Leave/Sick Leave
  • Military and Family Emergency Leave
  • Paid Holidays
  • Performance Bonuses
  • Medical and Dental Plans
  • Direct Deposit Payroll
  • 401K Plan with Company Matching and Immediate Vesting
  • Tuition Reimbursement
  • In-house Seminars/Workshops/Classes
  • Management Retreats/Seminar

(Please note that ADNET does not currently support Federal internship programs and is no longer accepting resumes for Federal internships.)

USAJOBS – Job Announcement

Program Analyst

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Overview

Open & closing dates
Service
Pay scale & grade
Salary

$102,663 to $157,709 per year

Appointment type

Temporary – Temporary promotion NTE 1 year with option to extend or make permanent without further competition.

Work schedule

Location

1 vacancy in the following location:

Relocation expenses reimbursed
Telework eligible

Yes as determined by agency policy

This job is open to

Internal to an agency

Current federal employees of this agency.

Clarification from the agency

Current Goddard Space Flight Center employees on career, career conditional, non-competitive, and NASA term appointments that provide for conversion eligibility. Current NASA employees on long-term rotational assignments to the NASA Engineering and Safety Center or the NASA Safety Center.

Announcement number
Control number

Duties

Summary

The Office of the Chief Financial Officer, Program Analysis Office, Program Planning, Analysis and Evaluation Branch (Code 153.1) is seeking a senior analyst to integrate budget plans and requirements, and monitor and analyze performance of the various programs, projects and directorates into a balanced GSFC wide plan, and advise Center management of the most effective and economical means of budget formulation, presentation and execution of these plans.

Responsibilities

  • As a Program Analyst, you will evaluate, plan, and direct the analytical and evaluative work related to the development and presentation of budget plans and programs. Plan, establish, and direct programs implementing administrative control systems.
  • Analyze direction and guidance to the Center to determine the level and type of information required to understand and evaluate the guidelines. Coordinate the preparation of obligation and expenditure schedules, special studies, and reports.
  • Coordinate all phases of budget development, monitor budget expenditures, and report to upper management. Implement and monitor financial management controls.
  • Identify programmatic and policy issues, including technical and management risks and associated resource requirements that should be addressed.
  • Analyze and evaluate the administrative aspects of substantive, mission-oriented programs. Develop long-range program plans, goals, objectives, and milestones for evaluating/measuring the effectiveness of major Center programs that affect the agency.
  • Perform all analysis associated with the assigned programs and projects, including communication to Center Management, and recommended approach for program and resource decisions.
  • Integrate the results of individual analysts into more comprehensive analysis. Oversee all activities within the office which are in support of, and provides important program-specific information to the cognizant analysts.
  • Plan, establish, and direct a cost effectiveness program for large, difficult and diverse projects. Establish short- and long-range program goals, develop detailed plans for implementing them, and oversee implementation of the goals.
  • Determine if adjustments or changes in objectives or emphasis are needed in organization functions. Identify risks, potential problems and alternative courses of action in advance of decision milestones.
  • Direct the capture, reporting, and analysis of statistical data relating to the organization’s operations and directs or personally performs special studies or projects.
  • Conduct studies of resources requirements to carry out proposed programs using cost information available in the NASA Core Finance system, and other analytical tools to assess future needs.
  • Develop plans and implement activity within the Program Analysis Office to maintain awareness of cost and schedule assessment activities being conducted at the Agency level.

Travel Required

Occasional travel – Travel may be required for training or other work-related duties

Supervisory status
Promotion Potential

Job family (Series)

Requirements

Conditions of Employment

Qualifications

Applicant must have one year of specialized experience at the next lower grade, which has equipped the applicant with the particular competencies needed to successfully perform the duties of the position described above.

GS-14: One year of specialized experience at the next lower grade level (GS-13) is defined as managing budget formulation and execution of complex program/project budgets; and evaluating, planning, and directing the analytical or evaluative work related to the development and presentation of budget plans and programs. Also, experience in evaluating cost and schedule performance of spaceflight hardware projects (including spacecraft bus and/or scientific instruments) including key risks, margins, and cost and schedule drivers, using program management techniques such as Earned Value Management (EVM).

GS-13: One year of specialized experience at the next lower grade level (GS-12) is defined as formulating and execution of complex program/project budgets; and conducting the analytical or evaluative work related to the development and presentation of budget plans and programs. Also, experience in reviewing the findings and risks associated with project plans and evaluating the potential for the program/project budget to fund the planned cost phasing.

Your resume must include a clear and detailed narrative description, in your own words, of how you meet the required specialized experience. Experiences copied from a position description, vacancy announcement or other reference material constitutes plagiarism and may result in disqualification and losing consideration for the job.

Education

There are no education requirements for this position.

Additional information

This position may be filled at either the GS-13 or GS-14 level.

Identification of promotion in this position does not constitute a commitment or an obligation on the part of management to promote the employee. Promotion will depend upon administrative approval and the continued need for an actual assignment and performance of higher level duties.

This is a temporary promotion not to exceed 1 year with the option to extend or make permanent without further competition.

Upon conclusion of your temporary promotion, you will be returned to your position of record or a position at the same grade at the Goddard Space Flight Center. Your salary will be set to the step you would have held had you continued in your General Schedule position, to include any within grade increases you may have been eligible for during the time that you were on the temporary promotion.

As identical vacancies are identified, additional selections may be made.

Individuals who have special priority selection rights under the Agency Career Transition Assistance Program (CTAP) or the Interagency Career Transition Assistance Program (ICTAP) must be well qualified for the position to receive consideration for special priority selection. See ‘How You Will Be Evaluated’ for definition of well qualified. Federal employees seeking CTAP/ICTAP consideration must indicate their eligibility when applying for a position. The USAJOBS resume asks you to identify your ICTAP eligibility; the NASA Supplemental Information asks you to identify your CTAP eligibility. If you are selected for the position, you must be prepared to submit proof that you meet the requirements for CTAP/ICTAP. This includes a copy of the agency notice, a copy of their most recent Performance Rating and a copy of their most recent SF-50 noting current position, grade level, and duty location.

Qualified NASA term employees who have term conversion eligibility under the NASA Flexibility Act of 2004 will be referred and considered equally with other NASA permanent employees under internal competitive placement procedures.

Your USAJOBS account asks you to assign a name to each of your resumes. When you apply to a NASA position, we will show you the text of the resume you have submitted, but we do not maintain the name you have assigned to that resume. If you wish to keep track of that information, we recommend you make note of it at the time you apply.

How You Will Be Evaluated

You will be evaluated for this job based on how well you meet the qualifications above.

Resumes will be rated by an automated system (Resumix) that matches the competencies extracted from the candidate’s resume to the competencies identified by the selecting official for the position. Candidates will be evaluated on the competencies they possess that are directly related to the duties of the job, as described in the announcement. Candidates should refer to NASA’s Applicant Guide for assistance in developing a complete resume, as NASA will not accept separate KSA statements.

Qualified candidates will be assigned to one of three quality levels based on the degree to which their competencies meet the duties required. A human resources specialist will validate the qualifications of those candidates eligible to be referred to the selecting official. For the purpose of the Career Transition Assistance Program (CTAP) and the Interagency Career Transition Assistance Program (ICTAP), candidates rated in the top quality level are considered well-qualified.

60k-$150k Nasa MSFC Jobs (NOW HIRING), ZipRecruiter

40 Nasa MSFC Jobs

Program Manager 2

Northrop Grumman Huntsville, AL

The Program Manager for SLS Operations in Huntsville is responsible for managing Northrop Grumman’s Resident Management Office (RMO) at NASA‘s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and other support .

Data Systems Analyst 3

Victory Solutions Inc. Huntsville, AL

We are looking for a Data Systems Analyst 3 to support the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Space Launch System in Huntsville, AL to start soon! General Summary: Mid-level Information .

BT-1848 Subject Matter Expert I (Software Safety)

Bastion Technologies Huntsville, AL

Work is performed at the NASA MSFC in Huntsville, Alabama and will require frequent interaction with multiple external and internal customers. Required Skills: * Bachelor’s degree in Systems .

BT-1846 Subject Matter Expert I (Software Reliability Engineer)

Bastion Technologies Huntsville, AL

Work is performed at the NASA MSFC in Huntsville, Alabama and will require frequent interaction with multiple external and internal customers. Job Requirements: * Bachelor’s degree in Systems .

Computer Science Engineer – Virtual Reality

Qualis Corporation Huntsville, AL

Qualis Corporation is seeking a Computer Science Engineer – Virtual Reality, to provide Virtual Reality (VR)/Augmented Reality (AR) support to the NASA MSFC System Analysis Branch (EV74) and Human .

Information and Data Management Support Specialist 3

Victory Solutions Inc. Huntsville, AL

Ability to obtain clearance/access onsite at NASA MSFC required. Job Posted by ApplicantPro

Jacobs Space Exploration Group Summer Intern

This position will support a NASA MSFC Engineering or Science Directorate. * Work within a highly integrated team of senior engineers or scientists. * Be introduced to the processes and then help .

Systems Engineer – SPIE

Familiarity with NASA MSFC processes, procedures and requirementsis required. Experience in program integration, requirementsdevelopment/management, verification and validation is required

Engineering Technician III/IV

Will provide general technical support to the NASAMSFC METTS contract. Immediate duties will require following a test plan to gather data in support of a study that has an ultimate goal of .

Graphic Designer

Abacus Technology Huntsville, AL

Ensure design/graphic activities take into account aesthetics, targeted audience(s), and NASA/MSFC theme(s) and message(s). Report to customers on exhibit concepts and design requirements. Produce .

Credentialing Systems Engineer_NASA_EAST New!

SAIC is seeking a candidate to provide engineering and operational support for NASA‘s Credential . On-site at MSFC is required due to lab access * Ability to complete a US Government Tier 4 .

Credentialing Systems Engineer_NASA_EAST

SAIC is seeking a candidate to provide engineering and operational support for NASA‘s Credential . On-site at MSFC is required due to lab access * Ability to complete a US Government Tier 4 .

Electronics Design Engineer – NASA Humanoid Robot Electronics Systems

Barrios Technology Houston, TX

Our primary locations are at NASA‘s Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, TX and the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, AL. We also support commercial space programs and provide .

Payload Systems Engineer (NASA ISS)

Primary contractor point of contact to the MSFC Payload Rack Officer (PRO) position, Data . Preferred Qualifications + Familiarity with life sciences NASA support operations, including .

NASA/HOSC Network Systems Architect

COLSA Corporation Huntsville, AL

. MSFC Ground Systems networks to ensure VPN, firewall, antivirus, content filtering, intrusion detection, network management, and secure VoIP are implemented and maintained in compliance with NASA CSO .

Principal Systems Engineer New!

Barrios Technology Houston, TX

Our primary locations are at NASA‘s Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, TX and the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, AL. We also support commercial space programs and provide .

Project Engineer

The Jacobs Brand Huntsville, AL

Project Engineer supporting the Solar Cruiser project at NASA‘s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in the Science and Technology Office. The Solar Cruiser project will demonstrate small satellite .

Summer Intern – Avionics New!

The Jacobs Brand Huntsville, AL

This work will be in support of the NASA Space Launch system as well as other current and future NASA programs or projects in the Electrical Integration and Power Subsystems Branch (ES44) at MSFC

Project Engineer, HSFE

The Aerospace Corporation Huntsville, AL

Support MSFC projects to ensure delivery of timely quality products and services to NASA‘s Marshall Spaceflight Center * Support Programmatic and Technical Integration across government and .

Senior Analyst, Lead – 31166

Alion Science and Technology Redstone Arsenal, AL

TDM is a Level 2 office and is one of 12 programs in the Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) located at NASA headquarters. TDM is resident at MSFC but reports directly to STMD.The candidate .

* Salary estimates (ZipEstimate) are not verified by employers; actual compensation can vary considerably. To learn more about Compensation Estimates, please see our FAQ

Nasa MSFC Salaries

$90,965/year

$90,965 Average

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Blue Origin, Careers

Become Part of History by Helping Us Build the Future

Working at Blue Origin

At Blue Origin, our genuine passion for space exploration is evident through the work we do. We’re looking for people who share that passion and want to turn their career into a calling. We’re shaping our future in space and we’re looking for dedicated and inspired people to join us.

If you share our dedication to thoughtful development and meticulous testing, there may be a fit for you at one of our locations across the country. Our engineering, manufacturing and business teams challenge the impossible every day in our 260,000-square-foot facility on 26 acres in Kent, Washington – just 20 minutes south of Seattle. We test the country’s next-generation engines and launch New Shepard at our facility in West Texas at the world’s only privately owned and operated launch site. Our orbital launch vehicle, New Glenn, will come to life at the active rocket factory at Cape Canaveral, Florida, where we’re one of the only launch companies building right on the space coast. The engines that will power New Glenn will be built in Huntsville, Alabama, where we’re currently building an engine production facility and refurbishing the historic Test Stand 4670 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.

Career Opportunities Across the USA

Kent, WA

Blue Origin’s company headquarters, located just 20 minutes south of Seattle. Our Kent facility is the hub of our operations, where we design and build New Shepard and our engines.

Van Horn, TX

Located 2 hours east of El Paso, Van Horn is home to our New Shepard test program and operations, as well as our engine development testing for our BE-3 and BE-4 engines.

Cape Canaveral, FL

Home to our New Glenn manufacturing, orbital launch and support facilities. Located in Exploration Park near the Kennedy Space Center.

Arlington, VA

Our East Coast business office supporting government relations, sales and business development efforts.

Huntsville, AL

Our world-class engine manufacturing facility in The Rocket City will conduct high rate production of the BE-4 and BE-3U engines. These engines will undergo testing at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center on the historic Test Stand 4670. BE-7, our lunar landing engine, is also currently in test at NASA Marshall.

Los Angeles, CA

Our new Los Angeles office supporting rocket propulsion design and engineering.

My teammates are the rock stars in our band. I love to be part of a team where working hard is ingrained in how we help, support and serve.

At Blue, my team is fearless in exploring new ways to accomplish things. I am empowered to propose ideas and processes which improve how we design, build and test.

Blue will empower you to take the safety discipline personally. In this environment, we’re doing safety right because we choose to

We are builders, inventors and makers. This is a place where people are inspired to do some of the best work of their lives.

Blue gives me a refreshing freedom to impact not just one part, but the entire big picture of the systems I work on.

It is not hard to wake up every day when your mission is enabling a permanent human presence in space.

I used to pore over star charts. Now I get to watch my ideas go from the whiteboard, to real functioning rocket parts, then all the way to space.

I was one of those kids that watched the space race almost from the start. For as long as I can remember, this is what I wanted to do.

I came to Blue as an intern because I wanted to build a career centered around human spaceflight. That 10-week internship changed my life.

The hard work preparing for flight is always worth it when you see customers getting their hardware back after its trip to space.

I got to install the largest-ever windows in a space vehicle, test them, and watch them perform with flying colors.

How NASA Joined the Civil Rights Revolution, History, Air – Space Magazine

How NASA Joined the Civil Rights Revolution

Integration came to the nation’s space agency in the mid-1960s.

On May 13, 1961, in its first issue after Alan Shepard’s historic Mercury mission, the nation’s leading black newspaper, the New York Amsterdam News, ran a front-page column that asked a question on the minds of millions of Americans. “If you are like me,” wrote executive editor James Hicks, “as soon as you finished thrilling to the flight of the United States’s first man into outer space, your next thought was, ‘I wonder if there were any Negroes who had anything to do with Commander Shepard’s flight?’ ” History forced President John F. Kennedy to commit the country to explore space at exactly the same time it forced him to confront the movement for civil rights. Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin’s Earth orbit, the failed Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba, Alan Shepard’s flight, the Freedom Rides with their attendant violence and imposition of martial law, and Kennedy’s man-on-the-moon-by-the-end-of-the-decade speech all happened within weeks of one another in 1961.

More than 50 years later, few people know about the first African-Americans in the space program. They performed mathematical and engineering work at a time when laws would not allow them to use the same bathroom as their white co-workers.

Among them was a small group of young African-American men who left Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in January 1964 to work at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. These men did not lead protests or stage sit-ins (even when given the opportunity), but what they accomplished as NASA’s first black engineers was part of the civil rights revolution.

Kennedy chose federal employment as one of the tools to force integration at precisely the time that NASA and its contractors were creating 200,000 jobs in Alabama, Florida, Texas, Mississippi, and Louisiana. It is possible that Kennedy took this route because he doubted Congress would give him the power to do anything greater through legislation. But Vice President Lyndon Johnson, who believed the root of racial injustice was southern poverty, believed that one way to achieve racial integration was to create jobs. He thought an activist federal government could pour money into the region and bring it into the nation’s social and economic mainstream. After Kennedy placed Johnson at the head of both his National Aeronautics and Space Council and the President’s Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity, the vice president was well positioned to implement his plan. For many African-Americans who went to work for NASA, the new space program created employment opportunities that had never before been available to them.

There is a short list of steps NASA took to promote equal employment in the year before the 1964 Civil Rights Act became law: The agency created a contractors’ group in Alabama that used its money and influence to make sure African-Americans got space jobs. NASA hired Charlie Smoot, called the “first Negro recruiter” in official agency histories, to travel the nation persuading black scientists and engineers to come south. The Marshall Space Flight Center invited representatives of the historically black colleges to Huntsville in 1963, and a year later opened the agency’s college cooperative education program—in which students alternated semesters at school with semesters at Marshall—to blacks.

As a result, Walter Applewhite, Wesley Carter, George Bourda, Tommy Dubone, William Winfield, Frank C. Williams Jr., and Morgan Watson arrived at Marshall to become the embodiment of Johnson’s plan for jobs in the South.

NASA’s Cooperative Education Program
When he was young, Morgan Watson says, he didn’t have a green thumb, but had what he calls “a greasy thumb”: He liked taking things apart and putting them back together. “I worked in a hardware store,” he says, “and the white store owner saw my report card one day and saw that I had good grades in math and science, chemistry, and so forth, and he said, ‘You know, you would probably make a good engineer.’ ” Watson didn’t know what an engineer did, “so I went to the library and started reading about [them].”

Watson eventually entered the new engineering school at the all-black Southern University–Baton Rouge. By the time Charlie Smoot arrived, the university faculty considered Watson and six other young men the most promising engineering students at the school.

The seven were given exams, though Smoot reports that none of the white students who found jobs at NASA through the Co-Op program were required to take them. Once the agency was convinced the students were eligible, they were hired.

About Richard Paul

Richard Paul, a public radio documentary producer, wrote the program Race and the Space Race (produced with Soundprint Media Center). He is currently finishing a book on the first African-Americans in the space program, titled And We Could Not Fail, with Steve Moss of Texas State Technical College at Waco.

Aerospace Engineer, Aerospace Testing International

Aerospace Engineer

Website NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is seeking an Aerospace, Electrical, or Mechanical Engineer to join the Components and Hardware Systems Branch. This position performs engineering design and analysis work for structures, hardware, equipment and systems; researching, developing, designing, testing, or evaluating navigation guidance or controls systems for aerospace vehicles.

Responsibilities

  • Evaluates design objectives and ensures that project requirements are met.
  • Performs complex design calculations for planning, design and development of guidance and control systems for aerospace vehicles.
  • Coordinates complex engineering assignments to address interacting factors concepts or conditions such as experimental flight research of control systems for advanced vehicles.
  • Monitors and provides technical oversight of contractors and provides guidance in developing new systems.
  • Conducts thermal analysis, fluid and flight mechanics aerospace engineering work, flight systems aerospace engineering work, and additional data systems and analysis work.
  • Addresses technical problems and implement corrective actions.
  • Coordinates design development for multi-purpose materials and structure projects.
  • Performing quality control and quality analysis methods to determine risks and compliance standards for work.
  • Directs the development of leading edge aerospace technology, equipment or systems to meet mission requirements.
  • Duties assigned will be commensurate with the grade of selected employee.

Travel Required

Occasional travel – Travel may be required for training or other work-related duties

Requirements

Conditions of Employment

  • Position subject to pre-employment background investigation
  • A one-year probationary period may be required
  • Position subject to a pre-employment drug test
  • This is a drug-testing designated position
  • This is a Bargaining Unit Position

Qualifications

In addition to the Basic Education Requirement, applicants must meet one of the following requirements for a GS-11:
(a) One year of professional experience in an appropriate field at least equivalent in difficulty and responsibility to GS-09 level work in the Federal service. Specialized experience includes experience in multi-disciplinary engineering concepts, methods, and processes related to the engineering design and analysis work (e.g. thermal, flight, data) for structures, hardware, equipment and systems for aerospace vehicles; or

(b) Completion of all requirements for a doctoral degree (Ph.D. or equivalent) in an appropriate field; or

(c) Completion of three full academic years of graduate education in an appropriate field; or

(d) An equivalent combination of experience and graduate education.

For GS-12: Applicant must have one year of specialized experience at the next lower grade, equivalent to a
GS-11, which has equipped the applicant with the particular competencies needed to successfully perform the duties of the position described above. Specialized experience at the GS-12 grade level is defined as professional working experience that included the following:

Demonstrates knowledge in optics, solid state detectors, gyroscopic dynamics, electronics, and space craft
sensor engineering. Experience with state-of-the-art space craft control systems and guidance sensors, complex space craft pointing and control actuators and systems for scientific applications and their supporting ground systems. Sensors and actuators include but are not limited to reaction wheels, earth and sun sensors, gyroscopes, global positioning systems, and magnetometers.

Experience with identifying resources and the manpower required to design, develop, and test a space craft control component.

Knowledge in contract management to procure components.

You may lose consideration for the position if your application does not include all the information requested on the vacancy announcement.

The USAJOBS Resume must include a clear and detailed narrative
description, in your own words, of how you met the required specialized experience. Experiences copied from a position description, vacancy announcement or other reference material constitutes plagiarism and may result in disqualification and losing consideration for the job.

A bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with major study in engineering, physical science, mathematics, life sciences, computer science, or other field of science. Degrees in engineering technology are not considered to be qualifying for this position. You must indicate your major as well as your degree in order to receive full consideration.

Please indicate the name of your college, major, degree and completion date in the education section. The degree must have been received in the year of, or any year subsequent to the original date of accreditation. To find out if a school has an ABET accreditation, go to ABET accredited schools
(http://www.abet.org).

The accreditation, type of degree, and course work taken will determine if the basic education requirements
are met.

For GS-11: Required college majors for applicants qualifying on the basis of undergraduate or graduate
education only:
Aeronautical Engineering, Aeronautics, Aerospace Engineering, Astronautical Engineering, Astronautics,
Astrophysics, Electrical Engineering (except power), Electronics Engineering, Applied Mechanics,
Engineering Mechanics, Mechanical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Physics,
Physics, Applied Physics, Engineering Physics. Other appropriate physical or computer science,
mathematics or engineering fields are qualifying if the major includes or is supplemented by at least 12
semester hours (or the equivalent) of appropriate physical science or engineering courses including nine
semester hours (or the equivalent) of physics, thermodynamics, fluid dynamics or gas dynamics.

You must provide evidence, if your education is completed outside of the United States, that it has been deemed equivalent to that gained in conventional/accredited U.S. education programs to be acceptable for Federal employment. Most foreign education is not accredited by an accrediting body that is recognized by the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education.

Additional information

As identical vacancies are identified, additional selections may be made.

If you have special priority selection rights under the Agency Career Transition Assistance Program (CTAP) or the Interagency Career Transition Assistance Program (ICTAP), you must:

Indicate your eligibility when applying for a position. The USAJOBS resume asks you to identify your ICTAP eligibility; the NASA Supplemental Information asks you to identify your CTAP eligibility.

Be well qualified for this position to receive consideration. See ‘How You Will Be Evaluated’ for NASA’s definition of well qualified.

Be prepared to submit proof that you meet the requirements for CTAP/ICTAP if you are selected for the position. This includes copies of your agency notice, most recent Performance Rating and most recent Notification of Personnel Action (SF-50) noting current position, grade level, and duty location

How You Will Be Evaluated

You will be evaluated for this job based on how well you meet the qualifications above.

This position is announced under Direct Hire authority. A Human Resources Specialist will review your resume to determine if you meet the qualifications and eligibility requirements as listed in ‘Requirements’.

CTAP and ICTAP candidates will be assessed using NASA STARS, an automated system that matches the competencies extracted from your resume to the competencies identified by the selecting official for the position. Based on the competencies you match, you are placed in one of three categories identified as 90, 80, or 70 point quality categories, which are defined as:

90 pt. Category – Tentatively meets (until subsequent confirmation upon referral) the basic qualification requirements identified in the vacancy announcement and has experience in the same or similar job that has demonstrated superior proficiency in the primary requirements of the position.

80 pt. Category – Tentatively meets (until subsequent confirmation upon referral) the basic qualification requirements identified in the vacancy announcement and demonstrates satisfactory proficiency in the primary requirements of the position.

70 pt. Category – Fails to meet criteria described in the 80 pt. category.

For the purpose of the CTAP and ICTAP, candidates rated in the top quality (90 pt.) category are considered well-qualified.

Required Documents

NASA’s application process has been specifically developed to ensure that we only ask you for the information we absolutely need to evaluate your qualifications and eligibility. In order to apply for this position, you only need to submit your resume and answer the screening questions and supplemental information. No additional documentation is accepted at the time of application. (For example you need not submit narrative ‘KSA’ statements; they are not required and will not be evaluated.) In this way we allow you to focus on preparing a resume that best describes your background and abilities. For assistance in preparing your resume, consult the Applicant Guide. Nothing further is required until requested by the Human Resources Office. At that point, we may ask you to submit documentation to support statements made in your resume. For example, we may ask you to provide academic transcripts or proof of Federal employment status. If you fail to provide the required documents within the stated time period, we may withdraw a job offer and/or remove you from further consideration.

To receive consideration, you must submit a resume and answer NASA-specific questions. The NASA questions appear after you submit your resume and are transferred to the NASA web site. If you successfully apply, USAJOBS will show your application status as ‘Received’. If your status is ‘Application Status Not Available’, you have not successfully applied. Do not rely on a USAJOBS email to confirm successful application. Only an email from NASA confirms a successful application.

If you are relying on your education to meet qualification requirements:

Education must be accredited by an accrediting institution recognized by the U.S. Department of Education in order for it to be credited towards qualifications. Therefore, provide only the attendance and/or degrees from schools accredited by accrediting institutions recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.

Failure to provide all of the required information as stated in this vacancy announcement may result in an ineligible rating or may affect the overall rating.

A career with the U.S. Government provides employees with a comprehensive benefits package. As a federal employee, you and your family will have access to a range of benefits that are designed to make your federal career very rewarding.

Eligibility for benefits depends on the type of position you hold and whether your position is full-time, part-time, or intermittent. Contact the hiring agency for more information on the specific benefits offered.

How to Apply

Before you begin the application process, please read the vacancy announcement carefully and have all required information available. Failure to submit a resume that contains all of the required information may result in loss of consideration. Your application must be received no later than midnight Eastern Time on the closing date of the announcement.

You may begin the process of submitting your resume by clicking on the ‘Apply Online’ link. In order to be considered, you must submit a resume completed on the USAJOBS site. When completing your USAJOBS resume, please remember that NASA limits resumes to approximately 32,000 characters including spaces.

NASA does not accept uploaded resumes created outside of the USAJOBS resume builder process. Additionally, NASA does not accept documents attached through the USAJOBS’ document attachment feature.

Once you submit your resume to NASA, you will be transferred to a NASA website and asked to complete a short series of NASA-specific questions. Your answers will not be saved unless you finish the entire application. You may edit a previously-submitted application, if the announcement is still open.

If you successfully apply, USAJOBS will show your application status as ‘Received’. If your status is ‘Unavailable’, you have not successfully applied. Do not rely on a USAJOBS email to confirm successful application. Only an email from NASA confirms a successful application.

If you are unable to apply electronically for this position, submit your resume and supplemental questions to:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
4200 Rideout Road
Resume Operations Center/Mailstop: HS50
Marshall Space Flight Center, AL 35812
DO NOT submit your resume directly to the Center advertising this vacancy. Mailed resumes must be received by the close of business on the closing date of the announcement. Hard copy resumes requirements are provided at: Hard Copy Resume Requirements.

If you are a first time applicant, we recommend that you review NASA’s Applicant Guide to ensure that you are providing a complete resume. Failure to submit the supplemental data and a resume that contains all of the required information may result in loss of consideration for positions. All applications must be received no later than midnight Eastern Time on the closing date of the announcement.

Agency contact information

Phone 877-677-2123

NASA’s Resume Operations Center
4200 Rideout Road, Mailstop HS50
Marshall Space Flight Center, AL 35812
US

Next steps

If you are found to meet the qualification and eligibility requirements, you will be referred to the selecting official for further consideration. (In some cases, individuals with priority for special consideration must be considered and selected before other candidates.) Whether or not you are contacted for an interview depends upon the location of the position and the judgment of the selecting official. At NASA, we pride ourselves on efficient and timely recruitment actions, and you can normally expect to learn the outcome of the selection process in a fairly short period of time. In addition, to ensure that you can measure progress for yourself, NASA provides you with regularly updated information on the status of the vacancy announcement

The University of Alabama in Huntsville & NASA Marshall Space Flight Center 2020 REU in Heliophysics in Huntsville, AL for The University of Alabama in Huntsville, CSPAR

SPS Jobs

The University of Alabama in Huntsville & NASA Marshall Space Flight Center 2020 REU in Heliophysics

The University of Alabama in Huntsville, CSPAR

The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) will host a Research Experience for Undergraduates in the summer of 2020. Ten undergraduate students will be invited to Huntsville, Alabama for 10 weeks to engage in cutting edge heliophysics research with astrophysicists from UAH or NASA. Students in this program will be paired with mentors specializing in heliophysics research from the solar interior to the heliopause: including theory, modeling, computer simulations, data analysis, and instrument design. At the end of the 10-week program, participants will be required to present their research experience. Partial funding (up to $1000) will be provided to attend the Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU Meeting Information) or the American Astronomical Society Meeting (AAS Meeting Information).

The program will run between May 26 – July 31, 2020. Students must be available for the entire 10 weeks in order to participate in the program.

Students will be provided a $6000 stipend for the summer. The stipend will include food and living expenses during the program. Additionally, a travel allowance and housing on the UAH campus (shared rooms) will be provided. A linen package will not be provided for the dorms. You will need to supply your own sheets and towels.

Heliophysics researchers from The University of Alabama in Huntsville and NASA Marshall Space Center are both housed in the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC) located on the UAH campus in Huntsville, Alabama.

Eligibility

Applicants should be full-time, undergraduate students with a GPA of 2.75 or better and majoring in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) fields. Students must be US citizens or green card holders in order to be considered for this program. You must be at least 19 years of age at the beginning of the program in order to be eligible. Rising sophomores, women and minorities are encouraged to apply.

To apply, visit this page. You will need to create an account on our sign-up page to complete this application. In addition, you will have to upload your resume and academic records (for example, transcripts) in PDF format, the contact information for two (2) recommenders, and to answer several essay questions. We recommend that you type your responses to the essay questions in a separate document and copy and paste them into your application. Your references will get an email right when you submit your application – you are responsible to check with them beforehand whether they want to provide a reference for you and let them know that they will get an automated email from us. You will get a notification email when a reference uploads a reference letter. If one or more of your references have not uploaded a letter by the deadline, your application is deemed incomplete. Academic records must be in English and must display the name of the institution, name of the student, completed coursework and grades. Unofficial transcripts are acceptable.

If selected, you will be required to submit your official transcripts.

Applications and unofficial transcripts must be received by midnight CST on Sunday, March 15th, 2020 (EXTENDED).

Additional Information

If you have any questions, please contact [email protected]

Please click here to reach our REU program website.

About University of Alabama in Huntsville

UTRGV, Internship at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center was key to student’s job offer

The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

Internship at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center was key to student’s job offer

A summer internship at NASA led UTRGV electrical engineering student Abigail Montalvo Schulze (seen here at the engineering robotics lab on the Edinburg Campus) to a job with Procter & Gamble before she even graduated. (UTRGV Photo by Paul Chouy)

By Cheryl Taylor

RIO GRANDE VALLEY, TEXAS – DEC. 31, 2015 – Weslaco native Abigail Montalvo Schulze looks forward to this time next year, hoping she and her family will enjoy a white Christmas at their new home in Pennsylvania.

Montalvo, an electrical engineering major at The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley who will receive her bachelor’s degree in May 2016, already has secured employment with Procter & Gamble at the company’s Mehoopany, Penn., facility that manufactures Charmin, Bounty and Pampers products.

“I credit my internship with NASA for opening this door,” Montalvo said. “I went to the campus Career Services job fair in late September, and that is where I met the recruiters from P&G. Their eyes lit up when they saw I had completed an internship with NASA.”

Montalvo, 26, spent the past summer at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Al., as an electrical engineering intern.

“Recruiters like to see that you have done internships because it shows that you have the dedication to go out and look for work, and it means you have experience in a work setting, even if it’s different than what you will be doing,” she said.

She said she is grateful to Dr. Heinrich Foltz, a professor in the UTRGV Department of Electrical Engineering, for encouraging her to apply for the NASA internship, and for writing her letter of recommendation.

“Dr. Foltz had an alumnus from UTPA (The University of Texas Pan American) who works at Goddard Space Flight Center give a presentation to my class on his work with NASA,” Montalvo said. “He said internships and co-ops are available, and the recruiters – especially those who graduated from UT Pan American and UT Brownsville/Texas Southmost College – are eager to see applicants from the Valley.”

At MSFC, Montalvo worked on the code for the flight software of a CubeSat, a miniature satellite, approximately 10 x 10 x 10cm, made for space research. She and her mentor, Pedro Capo-Lugo, communicated daily.

“Pedro was extremely intelligent, very kind and helpful,” she said. “He showed me what was expected of me for the project, told me how to do it, and gave me resources if I had any questions. He also put me in contact with a software engineer who was basically a coding genius, who helped me a lot while I was up there.”

Occasionally, the interns were escorted on tours of the MSFC campus, visiting different facilities where they could talk to engineers in different areas.

“It was so interesting to see all the different parts that make up NASA,” Montalvo said. “Every building, every group, is working on various tasks simultaneously, and somehow they all depend on and they all interconnect with each other at some point.”

Free time was spent hanging out with other interns, dancing, caving, LARPing (live action role-playing game), playing Super Smash Brothers, or taking off on a group trip organized by NASA employees.

“On one excursion, we went to Little River Falls, considered one of the highest-rated watering holes in the nation – and rightly so, because it was so beautiful,” she said.

Working for NASA has been a dream of Montalvo’s since she started taking engineering classes at the Science Academy of South Texas in Mercedes.

As a university engineering student, Montalvo took advantage of gaining hands-on experience. She was involved in mathematics research as a freshman, then participated in two programs of the National Science Foundation – the Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP) Summer Research Academy, and with Partnership for Research and Education in Materials (PREM), working in research on nanomaterials.

Montalvo said her summer at MSFC was a great experience in many ways.

“Practically everyone there is pretty amazing,” she said. “Honestly, I’ve never been in such an incredible work setting. The employees had this giant sense of integrity, like the honor system in the breakroom when someone was selling candy for a fundraiser – just leave a dollar and take a candy bar.”

She also appreciated the ethnic diversity of employees at MFSC, and how everyone “connected.”

“There wasn’t this sense of segregation that you sometimes see or feel in a lot of places,” she said. “Then, to top it all off, the people there are just brilliant, with a love and yearning for knowledge, answers and truth.”

Before the anticipated snowy Pennsylvania Christmas next year, Montalvo looks forward not only to her UTRGV graduation in May 2016 – but also to her 4-year-old son’s graduation from pre-K.

“In Mehoopany, I will be a process engineer. My son will be starting kindergarten. And my husband will be enrolled in college,” she said. “He has been our support during my education, and now it’ll be his turn to work on his degree.”

Marshall Space Flight Center Director Retires

Marshall space flight center jobs

Marshall Space Flight Center Director Retires
by Staff Writers
Huntsville AL (SPX) Mar 30, 2009


David King.

David King, director of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., is retiring from the agency to accept a position as executive vice president of Dynetics in Huntsville, effective immediately. Robert M. Lightfoot, Marshall’s deputy center director, will serve as acting director until a successor is named.

King has been the center director at Marshall since June 2003. His departure ends a 25-year career with NASA that began in 1983 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, where he served as director of space shuttle processing and shuttle launch director.

“David’s expertise and dedication will be sorely missed, not only at Marshall, but across the entire agency,” NASA Acting Administrator Chris Scolese said. “As sad as we are to see him leave, we wish him the very best in all of his future endeavors.”

King described his decision to leave NASA as one of the toughest of his professional career. “The opportunities NASA has given me are something most people only dream about,” King said. “It was a privilege to work with some of the smartest people in the world for 25 years. I will miss them greatly.”

King’s acting successor, Lightfoot, has served as Marshall’s deputy director since May 2007. A native of Montevallo, Ala., he has shared responsibility for managing Marshall, one of NASA’s largest field centers. The center has more than 8,400 civil service and contract employees performing a wide scope of propulsion, scientific and space transportation activities.

“Robert’s experience and leadership skills are exactly what we need to lead Marshall at this critical time,” Scolese said. “I’m certain he will do a terrific job in this role as he has in all of his previous positions at NASA.”

From 2005 to 2007, Lightfoot served as manager of the Space Shuttle Propulsion Office at Marshall, leading the organization with responsibility for the manufacture, assembly and operation of the primary shuttle propulsion elements: the main engines, external fuel tank, solid rocket boosters and reusable solid rocket motors.

For the two years prior to that, Lightfoot was assistant associate administrator for the Space Shuttle Program in the Office of Space Operations at NASA Headquarters in Washington. His responsibilities included space shuttle return to flight activities, budget formulation and integration of shuttle infrastructure into the Constellation Program, the new initiative of human exploration of the moon, Mars and beyond.

In 2002, Lightfoot was director of the Propulsion Test Directorate at NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Miss. He began his NASA career at Marshall in 1989 as a test engineer and program manager for the space shuttle main engine technology test bed program, and the Russian RD-180 engine testing program for the Atlas launch vehicle program.

Lightfoot has received numerous awards during his NASA career, including a NASA Outstanding Leadership medal in 2007 for outstanding and exemplary leadership of the Shuttle Propulsion Office and assuring safety for the shuttle’s return to flight. In 2006, he was awarded the Presidential Rank Award for Meritorious Executives – the highest honor attainable for federal government work.

“Robert is a tremendous leader and one of NASA’s best,” King said. “I leave with full confidence that Marshall will be in great hands.”

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SOFIA Science Mission Operations Director Selected
Moffett Field CA (SPX) Apr 13, 2009
Erick Young, a widely recognized authority on infrared astronomy, has been appointed science mission operations director for NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). Young’s appointment marks a major milestone for the airborne observatory, a highly modified Boeing 747SP aircraft fitted with a 2.5-meter/98-inch diameter infrared telescope. SOFIA is slated to be . read more

Got my first job! Working at NASA, FIU News – Florida International University

Got my first job! Working at NASA

September 9, 2019 at 2:00pm

In this series, recent grads share their journey to landing that first job out of college. After years of studying and working toward a degree, these Panthers’ hard work paid off. Now they’re paying it forward by letting you know how they did it.

Name: Sara Rengifo ’15

Hometown: Medellin, Colombia

Degree/Major: Master’s degree in mechanical engineering

Where are you working? I work for NASA at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center as a tribology and metrology engineer. We run tests for evaluating oils, greases, dry film lubricants and coating on materials, and we run inspections to determine the wear in mechanics.

How did you get your job? I got my job by applying online for a full-time position at NASA through USA Jobs, which is a government website with job opportunities within federal agencies. I honestly didn’t know if my application would be looked at, but to my surprise, I received a call for an interview within a couple of days and thanks to my preparation I was hired for the job.

What was your greatest fear going into your first job and how did you face it or overcome it? My greatest fear going into my first job was that I was nervous that my English would be a determining factor in my success. I was afraid I was not going to understand the technical parts of the discussions. I also began to doubt whether I was the right person for the job. Working hard and dedicating my time to this job helped me a lot to overcome this fear. Every day at home, I dedicated some time to review and research what I am learning/working on and after many hours of reading and asking questions I became much more proficient and learned more technical vocabulary.

What surprised you the most about your first job? What surprised me the most about my job here at NASA is that I was expecting to be working among very smart people who would not be willing to share their knowledge, but it turns out I was very wrong. I ended up working alongside talented engineers who were eager to hear my opinions and happy to discuss my thoughts about any issues during meetings.

What advice do you have for those beginning the job search process? I really encourage students to do research and try to get involved in any activities that involve science—science projects , student events or competitions. This will not only help your career path, but it will also help you grow as a professional. Also, get involved with job fair events at FIU. I participated in every single one and once I knew about my interview for this job, I participated in a mock interview workshop, which are done through CEC’s Career Services Team at FIU. I went there several times until I felt ready for the real job interview.

What does a day on the job look like? Every day is a challenge and every day is an opportunity to create. Working in the labs gives me the opportunity to be creative and responsive. At the same time, working from my office gives me an opportunity to talk with other engineers, technicians and co-workers to see the agency from different perspectives and observe how all the work I do in the labs can benefit the NASA mission that varies depending on which project is being worked on.

How does your job connect back to your coursework? In engineering everything is connected. People tend to think of science, engineering and technology as three separate things, but they’re actually closely connected. In the same way, the coursework learned in college is applied every day, not only at work but in everything around us. Scientists use the technologies that engineers create and engineers rely on the knowledge of the natural world developed by scientists. Just thinking about cars, airplanes, cellphones, etc. is a demonstration of this relationship.

How was your transition from school to work? How do you balance your time? Having more free time, allowing me to concentrate on what I want. Now, I use to-do lists and I am getting better at prioritizing tasks. Also, I have more time to read about those aspects of my job that I want to be better at. When I was still in school, balancing the time between the labs and the office helped me to become more organized today.

What’s been the coolest thing about your job so far? The people that I work with is the coolest thing about my job. Also, visiting other NASA centers and meeting so many talented engineers around the U.S. while getting to work in diverse teams where everyone’s opinion is valid and enriching.

Rengifo is with astronauts Harrison Schmidt (U.S. Senator and retired NASA astronaut, the most recent living person who has walked on the Moon) and Rex Wilheim (NASA astronaut), and MSFC Center Director Jody Singer.

Sara just received a prestigious Trailblazer award given “to recognize employees who are in the early stages of their career. Awardees must demonstrate strong work ethic and creative, innovative thinking in support of human spaceflight” at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, where she works as a Tribology and Metrology Engineer.